Saving the forests of the Congo Basin: Q&A with author Meindert Brouwer

first_imgArticle published by John Cannon Central African Forests Forever, first published in 2017, takes readers to the heart of the continent, introducing them to the people and wildlife of this region.Its author, independent communications consultant Meindert Brouwer, says the book also functions as a tool for sharing information about efforts to address poverty and environmental issues in the region.Mongabay spoke with Brouwer to learn more about his motivations and the reception of his work in Central Africa. It was an ambitious project from the start: to capture the Congo Basin rainforest in the pages of a book. Stretching across an area larger than Saudi Arabia, the world’s second-largest rainforest straddles six countries in Central Africa. Many are crippled by corruption, civil conflict, and seemingly solution-less problems at the intersection of poverty and environmental stewardship. The loss of the Congo Basin’s forests has lurched along more slowly than in the Amazon rainforest or the jungles of Southeast Asia, but many experts worry that that trend won’t hold. The region’s growing population and the need for economic development have already led to the rising destruction of unique ecosystems to make way for farms, mines and timber plantations.Nki Falls, Nki National Park, Cameroon. Image © Jaap van der Waarde/WWF.Perhaps such a book could introduce the world to this little-known part of Africa, highlighting why it needs protection and what’s working there to improve the lives of its inhabitants, thought Meindert Brouwer. The independent communications consultant with a quarter century of experience in conservation, much of it in Central Africa, knew it would be a challenge from the start. The paradox was that because the Congo Basin is less familiar to many people than the Amazon, it would be harder to rally the support necessary to launch the project.Indeed, Brouwer said, finding an initial funder took time. But since then, the book’s momentum has led the project in new directions. Brouwer quickly saw that the value of the book, Central African Forests Forever, first planned only for digital publication, lay not just in its distribution beyond Central Africa, but within the region as well. It’s become a tool, Brouwer said, that facilitates the exchange of ideas across the heart of the continent, so much so that few copies remain of the edition in French, the lingua franca in most Congo Basin countries.Mongabay spoke with Brouwer recently from his office in the Netherlands.The village of Siniya in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Image © Joachim-Maurice Maya Kumabo/Tropenbos International.Mongabay: Why did you decide to write and put together this book in the first place?Meindert Brouwer: I was at an international climate conference, showing my [previous] book about non-timber forest products from the Amazon rainforest many years ago. This woman from Africa said, “Write a book about the Congo Basin rainforest.” And so, I said, “I will.” That’s personal — I promised her to do this. But the main reason to write his book is to raise awareness about the very existence of the Congo Basin rainforest. When you’re in the street and you mention the word “rainforest” in Europe and the United States, everybody thinks of the Amazon. Hardly anyone knows about the Congo Basin rainforest. This book is meant to make the Congo Basin rainforest better known.What questions are you trying to address in the book?In my book, I start with a helicopter view by [former director of the International Tropical Timber Organization] Emmanuel Ze Meka, [with the questions], what’s going on in Central Africa? What’s at stake with regard to the rainforests? Then, I show the great biodiversity and the ecosystem services, which are key for the well-being of the people living there and for the world. I present issues and especially the solutions and opportunities for conservation and sustainable use of the Congo Basin rainforest, hand-in-hand with sustainable economic developments.For this reason, I also published a French version for the people in Central Africa so they can benefit from the best practices in the book. Let’s [take] charcoal. People go in the forest [and cut] trees for charcoal. That’s a big threat. There is a project in [the Democratic Republic of Congo] about charcoal, [in which] fast-growing trees [are grown] next to the farm, so people don’t need to go into the forest. They have enough charcoal, even more than they need themselves. Then, they can start selling charcoal and get away from poverty. When someone in Cameroon or Gabon reads about this example, [communities there] can do the same. When there’s something good in Cameroon and someone in [the Republic of Congo] reads about this, they can replicate it. That’s why there is a French version. What I have to stress is that this is not a book by a white man about Africa. I went to people from Central Africa, and I asked them, “What do you think needs to be done?” This is a book by Africans for Africans and for the world.An organic farmer in Cameroon. Image © Both ENDS and CENDEP.It does seem to be a guide for different approaches when it comes to looking at the forest and how we live in and around it.Yes, from many angles. There’s also a chapter about women’s rights and how to achieve women’s empowerment. Why? Because women know more about agriculture than men. They know more about the forest because they go into the forest, they look for vegetables, for mushrooms and for other food. They know their way around the forest, but their knowledge is not used in the communities. Of course, this is not good for the women themselves. This is not good for the community, and it’s not good for the forest. So I put women’s rights in the book because their empowerment is important for the forest.Langoué Bai in Ivindo National Park, Gabon. Image © David Greyo, courtesy of WCS and ANPN.Was it difficult to find funding, and might that be related to the lack of awareness that we have of the Congo Basin? For a lot of us, it’s still kind of this blank spot on the map in a lot of ways.At first, I approached the African Development Bank, and that door stayed closed. At some point, I came across COMIFAC (the Central African Forest Commission), a high-level organization of 10 countries in Central Africa focused on keeping the rainforest standing. And there is the Congo Basin Forest Partnership, [which is affiliated with COMIFAC]. In 2015 I went to the [organization’s] annual meeting in Cameroon to establish contacts both for content and funding. To make a long story short, the main funding comes from KfW (the German development bank), advised by the Central African Forest Commission to do so. It was the Africans who thought it was a good idea to produce a book like this.Sacks of charcoal in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Image © Isilda Nhantumbo.How did you select the people who either wrote chapters or played prominent roles as interview subjects in the book?I’ve traveled to Africa [for my work], and on the way I met people. I’ve been in communication of conservation for 25 years now. I have a lot of contacts also from previous books, so key experts advised me about whom to approach.You mentioned this being a personal project for you. I would imagine that having spent time in Central Africa, the place has affected you. Why is the Congo Basin important to you?First of all, it’s the people. I like getting to know the people of Central Africa very much. It’s not always easy to live in Central Africa. There’s a lot of poverty. There are a lot of problems, but many people still have a smile. I have this spot for them in my heart.There’s [also] this great rainforest with the great apes, and I love biodiversity. I get very sad and angry [to see] that biodiversity is diminishing, reduced by the way we organize our economy. I think the Congo Basin rainforest is a great treasure, and I want to help in ways I’m good at, [like] writing stories. That’s my way of getting attention and passing on good ideas to policymakers, to politicians, to NGOs, to banks, [and] to financial institutions.Also, I hope you agree that the reading is easy. Everybody who is 16 and speaks English should be able to understand what’s in the book. Why? Because many politicians and policymakers do not have specific knowledge of the rainforest, so I have to make it easy for them. When you have a look at the table of contents, which is two pages, you already know what’s going.The book went to European countries, but it was also passed on by others to forest institutions and companies in China, which is very important. A lot of timber [from Central Africa] often illegally goes through to China. Some institutions from China want to go in a sustainable direction, and they should. [It’s] in their own interest because if you keep emptying the forest, there will not be any timber in the future. Others brought the book to the United States Senate, and the book was on the table [during] international negotiations about financing conservation in the world, including forest conservation in the Congo Basin. The book has proven to be a good communication tool for the Congo Basin rainforest.Slash-and-burn agriculture in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Image by Meindert Brouwer.Why is it important to focus not just on the conservation of biodiversity, but the issues around sustainable use, for instance, Forest Stewardship Council certification and REDD+ (reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation)?Poverty needs to be addressed. Community development, economic development and improvement of income are key for forest conservation. If people have jobs and a decent income, they do not need to go into the forest for their livelihood. The book is about opportunities and solutions from many angles — economically, socially and ecologically. [In one example in the book], I wrote a story about community tourism, not about the high-end lodges where only the very rich go. When tourists come, people who have no jobs start getting an income because they look after transportation, they have a lodge, they cook for the tourists and the guides take them to the forest. My guide in Gabon used to be a hunter for commercial bushmeat, and he had no alternative. But now he has stopped hunting for commercial bushmeat because he’s paid by the tourists.[Similarly], if the people in the forest get a better yield and income from agriculture by being instructed about better techniques, if they can leave behind slash-and-burn agriculture, it’s in their benefit, and it’s also good for the forest.The chapter on palm oil production seems very much in that same vein. You’re talking about the need to build a foundation with the smallholders.People need palm oil, but you should produce it in a sensible and sustainable way. That’s why I approached this expert, [World Agroforestry Centre scientist] Peter Minang, who explains how you can do it in a sustainable way. It’s all about sustainability and balance. I stressed the necessity of sustainable agriculture because people need to eat. There is not enough food in the forest for so many people, and the population is growing, so there will be [parts] of the forest cut down for agriculture. It’s a main driver [of deforestation] together with the charcoal. If you have sustainable agriculture and you improve your yields, less forest needs to be cut.Nkundu girls in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Image © Jonas Eriksson Abana.Is there anything else you would like to add?The Congo Basin rainforest is very important for the well-being of the people in the region, for Africa as a whole and for the well-being of the world. Many tens of millions of people depend on it directly for their livelihood. It stores huge amounts of carbon dioxide and helps to reduce global warming. It is a rainmaker, indispensable for agriculture in sub-Saharan Africa. It is an immense source of fresh water in a world where fresh water gets more scarce every year. Its rivers can generate hydropower for the whole continent of Africa. There are many medicinal plant species, 20 of which are used in the treatment of cancer.Editor’s note: This interview was edited for length and clarity. All of the photos in this article appear in Central African Forests Forever by Meindert Brouwer.Banner image of Langoué Bai in Ivindo National Park, Gabon. Image © David Greyo/courtesy of WCS and ANPN. FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Agriculture, Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Bushmeat, Certification, China Logging, China’s Demand For Resources, Climate Change, Conservation, Corruption, Deforestation, Degraded Lands, Drivers Of Deforestation, Ecosystem Services, Ecotourism, Environment, Environmental Services, Forest People, Forest Stewardship Council, Forests, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Indigenous Peoples, Logging, Mining, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Plantations, Poaching, Poverty, Poverty Alleviation, Rainforest Agriculture, Rainforest Animals, Rainforest Biodiversity, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Ecological Services, Rainforest Logging, Rainforest Mining, Rainforests, Redd, Slash-and-burn, Timber, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Read more

Nunes set to hold off DaCosta’s charge

first_imgFACING a deficit of $924,550 following SHE’S A MANEATER’s breakaway and subsequent scratch in last Saturday’s Diamond Mile, champion trainer Wayne DaCosta has his top American two-year-olds, STRANGER DANGER and AMERICAN INVADER, all set to complete the exacta in this afternoon’s six-furlong Dye Job Sprint as he makes a desperate last-ditch bid to land an 18th title. Included in the line-up are Fitznahum Williams’ United States-bred debutant, SHACKLEVILLE, and five local-breds, including Nunes’ pair of JUICE MAN and UNIVERSAL BOSS. It will again be a matter of how far DaCosta’s foreigners beat the rest of the field, with STRANGER DANGER preferred to AMERICAN INVADER following his roaring run to catch the filly on debut, installed the 1-2 favourite to beat his stablemate, who had won on her first start. With an extra half-furlong to run, STRANGER DANGER, who had won at five and a half on debut, showed off his pedigree at exercise on November 25, clocking 1:05.3 for five and a half furlongs, the last five in 59.3, getting the better of AMERICAN INVADER. Having clocked 1:06.0 for five and a half furlongs last time out with only a head separating them, both are leagues above the opposition and should quickly make their way to grade one next season. Whereas DaCosta stands to earn $713,400 for a STRANGER DANGER-AMERICAN INVADER exacta and a possible win with down-in-class STORM, the champion trainer won’t put a dent in Anthony Nunes’ lead as FOOT SOLDIER, dropping from up the claiming ladder, won’t lose at eight and a half furlongs in the eighth and SUPREME SOUL, BIGDADDYKOOL’s half-brother by Soul Warrior – DISABILITY CHARM’s sire – is also a cinch at a mile in the Andrew H.B. Aguilar Memorial. After the number-crunching and drama of Diamond Mile Day settled, Nunes registered a $1.8 million swing on champion Wayne DaCosta to surge $924,550 ahead in the trainers’ standing, a lead which could have been $4m greater in another stride had the winning post not saved showboating Robert Halledeen’s hide aboard WILL IN CHARGE. It will be next to impossible for DaCosta to challenge Nunes, who has the Boxing Day $4 million Jamaica Two-Year-Old Stakes locked with CORAZON as the favourite to grab the $2.1 million winner’s purse, while his stablemates are fancied to pick up scraps in a race in which the champion trainer’s only hope is Diamond Mile Day debutant-winner RUN THATCHER RUN, SHE’S A MANEATER’s half-brother, by Fearless Vision, making him a full brother to 2000 Guineas winner ALI BABA. DaCosta, however, appears as if he’s not going down without a fight and has SHE’S A MANEATER lined up in a graded stakes sprint, going five and a half, next Saturday. If that race doesn’t fall through, she could very well pull a double shift by returning 11 days later in the Miracle Man Trophy, which replaces the Harry Jackson Memorial on Boxing Day, the distance reduced to nine furlongs and 25 yards. Should she compete in both, the combined winner’s purses is a little over $1.2 million, far less than DaCosta needs to chalk up an 18th trainers’ title, considering Nunes’ lead and his owners’ penchant for claiming horses high and dropping low. NEXT TO IMPOSSIBLElast_img read more

Read more

Development for everyone

first_imgIn the latest edition of its Human Development Report (2016), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) has concluded that in spite of impressive progress in human development made over the past quarter-century, many people are still behind, “with systemic, often unmeasured, barriers to catching up”.The report titled, “Human Development for Everyone”, finds that although average human development improved significantly across all regions from 1990 to 2015, one in three people worldwide continue to live in low levels of human development, as measured by the Human Development Index (HDI).At the launch of the report, which is usually compiled and published yearly by UNDP, Administrator Helen Clark noted that the world has come a long way in rolling back extreme poverty; in improving access to education, health and sanitation, and in expanding possibilities for women and girls – but emphasised, “those gains are a prelude to the next, possibly tougher challenge, to ensure the benefits of global progress reach everyone”.The report shows that in almost every country, several groups face disadvantages that often overlap and reinforce each other, increasing vulnerability, widening the progress gap across generations, and making it harder to catch up as the world moves on.According to the report, women and girls, rural dwellers, indigenous peoples, ethnic minorities, people with disabilities, migrants and refugees, and the LGBTI community are among those systematically excluded by barriers that are not purely economic but political, social and cultural as well.Further, the report mentions that populations living in rural areas also face multiple barriers. For instance, children from poor rural households attending school are less likely to be learning reading, writing and Mathematics.Of note too is that marginalised groups often have limited opportunities to influence the institutions and policies that determine their lives. The report underscores the point that changing this is central to breaking the vicious circle of exclusion and deprivation. For example, indigenous peoples account for five per cent of the world’s population, but 15 per cent of people living in poverty.As part of its numerous recommendations, the report calls for far greater attention to empowering the most marginalised in society, and for giving them a greater voice in decision-making processes.Additionally, the report calls for a more refined analysis to inform actions, including making a shift toward assessing progress in such areas as participation and autonomy. Key data, disaggregated for characteristics such as place, gender, socioeconomic status and ethnicity, is vital to know who is being left behind.Moreover, the report warns, key development metrics can overstate progress when they focus on the quantity, rather than the quality, of development. For instance, girls’ enrolment in primary education has increased, but in half of 53 developing countries with data, the majority of adult women who completed four to six years of primary school are illiterate.The UNDP believes that despite progress gaps, universal human development is attainable. It explains that over the past few decades, we have witnessed achievements in human development that were once thought impossible. For example, since 1990, one billion people have escaped extreme poverty, and women’s empowerment has become a mainstream issue. While as recently as the 1990s, very few countries legally protected women from domestic violence; today, 127 countries do.The report stresses the importance of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development to build on these gains, noting that the agenda and human development approach are mutually reinforcing. The report includes recommendations to reorient policies to ensure progress reaches those furthest behind, and urges reforms of global markets and global institutions to make them more equitable and representative.An important point mentioned in the report is that too much attention is placed on national averages, which often mask enormous variations in people’s lives. Hence, in order to move ahead with developmental aims, there is need to examine more closely not just what has been achieved, but also who has been excluded and why.last_img read more

Read more

American Idol rivals go head-to-head again

first_imgTwo former “American Idol” rivals second-season winner Ruben Studdard and runner-up Clay Aiken will battle again when their new albums are released next month. Aiken’s third album, “A Thousand Different Ways,” will be in stores Sept. 19. The new CD combines 10 cover versions of well-known songs from the ’70s, ’80s and ’90s with four new songs, RCA Records announced Thursday.. Studdard’s “The Return” will be released Sept. 26 on J Records. It follows his 2004 gospel album, “I Need an Angel.”. Studdard narrowly beat out Aiken to win the “American Idol” contest in May 2003. Their debut albums Aiken’s “Measure of a Man” and Studdard’s “Soulful” were released later that year, with Aiken’s CD in stores about two months before Studdard’s.. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWhy these photogenic dumplings are popping up in Los Angeles The first track on Studdard’s new CD is “The Return of the Velvet Teddy Bear,” the 27-year-old singer said earlier this week.. Tracks on Aiken’s new disc include Bryan Adams’ “Everything I Do (I Do It for You),” Celine Dion’s “Because You Loved Me” and Elton John’s “Sorry Seems to Be the Hardest Word.”. “This is an album of love songs, but they are about all different kinds of love. Romantic love, friendship, unconditional love,” Aiken said.. “Since so many of these songs are covers, it’s realistic to say that many of them have been or could be sung a thousand different ways,” the 27-year-old singer said.. “A Thousand Different Ways” follows Aiken’s 2004 release, “Merry Christmas With Love.”. 165Let’s talk business.Catch up on the business news closest to you with our daily newsletter. Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Read more

Celtic held by Livingstone and must wait for title triumph

first_img Big Sam makes ‘Allardicio’ Man United claim, says anyone can win with Celtic 3 3 Rangers vs Celtic: Kick-off time, how to watch for free and team news cup final Old Firm ‘Rangers must deliver’ – Celtic hero warns Gerrard and slams ‘serial loser’ Tavernier Celtic fans have cost club over €500,000 – ‘They’re an embarrassment’, says McCoist do it BRING IT ON Oliver Burke could have snatched a win in stoppage time but the Celtic substitute missed from close range.A Celtic win and a Motherwell victory over Rangers on Sunday would have sealed an eighth consecutive title for Neil Lennon’s men, but they will now have to wait until after the split for their inevitable coronation as champions.Celtic are now 14 points clear and the only way the title will be in the bag before Lennon returns to Easter Road to face Hibernian on April 21 is if Rangers take just a point from trips to Fir Park and Tynecastle beforehand.Two wins for Rangers would mean Celtic would need to wait at least until they host Kilmarnock on April 27 before they can wrap up matters. Celtic must wait at least two weeks to clinch the Ladbrokes Premiership title after being held to a 0-0 draw by Livingston on SaturdayThe leaders were denied by a string of first-half saves from Livi goalkeeper Liam Kelly and the home fans endured a frustrating second half as Gary Holt’s side sat in and restricted Celtic’s chances. Neil Lennon’s side couldn’t overcome Livingstone NAME GAME Man United, Arsenal, Wolves, Rangers and Celtic discover Europa League opponents Odsonne Edouard failed to find the breakthrough goal GOT IT ALL rival joy center_img Kelly made a routine save from McGregor after the interval but Celtic were finding it more difficult to break Livingston down and did not seriously threaten again until the 72nd minute, when a cross from Jonny Hayes fell kindly for fellow substitute Timothy Weah.The American made a mess of his finish and Kelly reacted quickly to block as Edouard tried to force home the loose ball from close range.Kelly saved Christie’s header and came off his line to stop Weah’s low cross reaching Edouard before getting a well-deserved slice of luck in stoppage-time. Burke missed the target from four yards after the goalkeeper could not hold Edouard’s strike. TOP BOSS Lennon made five changes from the midweek win over St Mirren with Kieran Tierney returning and Tom Rogic making his first start of the year following a knee injury.Livingston created the first chance as Craig Halkett was left in space to head towards goal but Scott Brown headed the ball behind for another corner.Celtic were soon on the attack and Ryan Christie forced Kelly’s first save as the Scotland squad goalkeeper parried a shot after a good move down the left.The champions were moving the ball about with pace and purpose and both Brown and Christie were off-target from the edge of the box before Kelly continued his good work. round-up Rangers slip up at Aberdeen as Celtic go two points clear in Scottish Premiership Arsenal fans are in for a treat when Tierney gets into stride, Brown says Tom Rogic made his first start of 2019 ultras Celtic skipper expecting Old Firm title race to go down to the wire this season ‘Celtic were lucky to have Brendan Rodgers’, says Bhoys captain Scott Brown CONFIRMED The keeper held Odsonne Edouard’s measured shot after the Frenchman was picked out by James Forrest. The latter tried himself moments later but Kelly brilliantly saved his shot with the outside of the boot.Forrest went on another good run before Tierney drove the ball across for Rogic to shoot first time but again Kelly stopped it.Scott Bain was also on form, tipping over Dolly Menga’s 25-yard strike on the turn before Kelly made further saves from Callum McGregor, Edouard and a particularly impressive one from Rogic before the break. Forster heroics as ten-man Celtic stun dominant Rangers to win League Cup LATEST CELTIC NEWS 3last_img read more

Read more

Maria prays The Happy Camper 2 will be a place of happiness

first_imgThe owners of The Happy Camper Cafe are experiencing a whirlwind of challenges and emotional moments this week as they try to rebuild their business.Maria and Jane McCormack’s quirky pancake and coffee van was destroyed in a freak accident last Easter Saturday at Glenveagh. The campervan rolled into the bog after a tow hook malfunction and it was unable to be salvaged.Maria was moved to tears today when she uploaded photos of smiling customers at The Happy Camper before the accident. “I posted Saturday’s Happy Campers there on the page and cried at how wonderful it had become and I’m just praying that the Happy Camper Mark 2 will be a place of as much happiness,” she told Donegal Woman.The Happy Camper on Easter SaturdayThe launch of a crowdfunding movement by friends to rebuild The Happy Camper has brought Maria and Jane hope as they received an outpouring of kindness. People did not hesitate to donate to the roadside cafe which brought them so much happiness on days out in Donegal, and the fund is getting very close to its €3,000 target.As well as the kindness and support from friends and customers, the sisters’ story has recently gained national attention in the media.The Happy Camper’s misfortune was the topic of discussion on The Six O’Clock Show on TV3, Today FM and other national media, which has inspired people all over Ireland rally to support the cause. Dermot and Dave have even promised to do one of their well-known adverts, called ‘Jingly Bits’, for the new cafe when its back on the road. Kind-hearted Creeslough man Dominic Lafferty went above and beyond by donating a vintage caravan to the McCormacks, which was received with much gratitude.Maria McCormack, The Happy CamperMaria’s brother James Mc Cormack got stuck in with renovating the van, but they have encountered difficulties in making the vehicle suitable as a cafe.“We are currently renovating it but unfortunately the inside is completely rotten when we removed the old outer layer. Everything has had to be stripped out and wet wood removed and now will be rebuilt,” Maria said.“We did run into difficulty when we found out that the inside is completely rotted. James is working around the clock to get it renovated.  He is working on cutting out all the new panels on the inside of the camper.“The space is small on the inside so not much room to get help at the moment. But we are really grateful for people’s offers,” Maria said. James is keeping Facebook followers updated on all steps of the rebuilding operation on The Happy Camper Mark 2. All funds raised by the generous Happy Camper community will go towards the intensive project, and Maria is hopeful that it will be enough.“We will do our damnedest to keep within this target,” she said.Visit the fundraiser page here: https://gogetfunding.com/rebuild-our-happy-camper/Maria prays The Happy Camper 2 will be a place of happiness was last modified: April 20th, 2017 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:CaféGlenveaghthe happy camperlast_img read more

Read more

Seven players to make first league start for Sligo on Sunday

first_imgSligo boss Cathal Corey has named seven players to start in the Allianz League for the first time for Sunday’s game away to Armagh.Newcomers Eddie McGuinness, Luke Nicholson and Mikey Gordon will form an all-new full-back line, while Finnian Cawley and Sean Carrabine have been named to start on the half-forward line.Darragh Cummins makes his first league start at centre-half-back, while James Clarke has been given a chance in midfield.Only three players that played Sligo’s last league game of 2017, a win away to Louth, are due to start at the Athletic Grounds – Neil Ewing, Keelan Cawley and Pat Hughes.Sunday’s game will be live on Ocean FM in association with EJ Menswear.SLIGO: A Devaney; L Nicholson, E McGuinness, M Gordon; Keelan Cawley, D Cummins, G O’Kelly-Lynch; J Clarke, P O’Connor; N Ewing, F Cawley, S Carrabine; A Marren, P Hughes, S Coen.ARMAGH: Blaine Hughes; Patrick Burns, Aaron McKay, Paul Hughes; Niall Rowland, Gregory McCabe, Mark Shields; Stephen Sheridan, Charlie Vernon; Ryan McShane, Aidan Forker, Ronan Lappin; Rory Grugan, Andrew Murnin, Ethan Rafferty.last_img read more

Read more

Friends race to help Paddy McBride fundraiser hit €10,000 target

first_imgA community campaign to support Downings man Patrick McBride’s cancer battle has gained a surge of support in recent days.The online fundraiser has crossed the €10,000 target line in just five days thanks to kind-hearted friends and family.Patrick McBride is a well-known marathon runner and community man who has helped vital charity campaigns over the years. Now Paddy has his own battle a rare cancer, for which his treatment begins today.Paddy and his wife Karen are in Dublin to start a two week radiotherapy course. He will then return to Letterkenny University for further tests and treatment.Paddy McBride in typical stance at Downings GAA Club.As the fight begins, friends of Paddy are keeping the positivity high and already wishing the runner a speedy recovery.Paddy is well-known in many local circles, having run 17 marathons for charity and being a valued part of the Downings GAA club. A spokesperson said: “We all know if there is one man that can fight this, Paddy is the man. With 17 marathons in the bag, this cancer doesn’t stand a chance.”Paddy and his family are set to benefit from continuous support during this difficult time as the fundraising shows no sign of stopping after surpassing the €10,000 target.If you would like to support Paddy’s fundraising campaign please visit https://www.gofundme.com/paddy-fenny-mcbride-fundraiser Friends race to help Paddy McBride fundraiser hit €10,000 target was last modified: November 6th, 2018 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:DowningsfundraisergofundmePaddy McBridelast_img read more

Read more

Job creation tops Youth Month agenda

first_img4 June 2013 Education, skills development, job creation and the fight against substance abuse will top the agenda for South Africa’s Youth Month programme this year, says Deputy Minister for Performance Monitoring and Evaluation Obed Bapela. Speaking to young people at the launch of the programme at the Hector Peterson Museum in Orlando, Soweto on Monday, Bapela said the government would hold a number of public participation sessions around the country during an Imbizo Focus Week taking place from 11 to 17 June. “The izimbizo will provide a great opportunity for communities and other entities to get involved and make their voices heard.”Presidential Youth Working Group Bapela said President Jacob Zuma had set up a Presidential Youth Working Group to provide a platform for youth leaders meet with him and Cabinet ministers to assess the progress the country had made in meeting their challenges. According to latest statistics, about three-million South Africans between the ages of 15 and 34 are currently jobless. Bapela said the National Youth Development Agency (NYDA) had helped to create more than 28 000 jobs in the last three years, while providing career guidance services to more than 1-million young people, granting over 110 bursaries and issuing more than 33 000 loans to small businesses. Calling on the government, business and labour to form strategic partnerships with the NYDA to reduce unemployment, Bapela said it was only when everyone in the country acted in concert “that the lives of young people will be changed for the better”.NYDA to discontinue loans, offer grants Yershen Pillay, the newly appointed NYDA board chairperson, said that with unemployment and lack of skills remaining a big challenge, the agency had shifted its focus from enterprise development to education and skills development. “[We want to change] from loan provision to grant finance, which will be a combination of career guidance, grants, training and mentorship programmes.” Pillay said the NYDA planned to reach over 700 000 young South Africans through career guidance alone, starting with 1 250 first-time entrepreneurs through various roadshows that taking place around the country in June.New education programme The June 16 Foundation, meanwhile, will be launching a programme to improve maths and science teaching at several schools around Soweto. Dan Motsitsi, the chairperson of the foundation, said they had partnered with Gauteng Department of Education MEC Barbara Creecy to roll out the ” Culture of Learning and Teaching” programme to priority schools in the township. He said that Soweto residents, under the leadership of the foundation, would take it upon themselves to ensure that the culture of learning was prioritised by their children. “Saturday and holiday classes will form part of the programme, starting from Grade 9, 10, 11 and Grade 12 learners,” he said. SAnews.gov.za and SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Read more

A tribute to South Africa’s neighbours

first_imgA photographic exhibition, On the Frontline, at the Nelson Mandela Foundation’s Centre of Memory reflects on the contribution – and the price they paid – from countries in Africa to helping the liberation struggle overcome apartheid. A makeshift, outdoor kitchen at the Tongogara Refugee Camp in Zimbabwe, 1989 (Image: Pieter Boersma, Nelson Mandela Foundation) Priya PitamberSouth Africa’s neighbouring countries, and others nearby, helped to bring an end to apartheid by assisting the liberation movement. A photographic exhibition, On the Frontline, at the Nelson Mandela Foundation’s Centre of Memory in Johannesburg, makes note of those contributions.At a time when xenophobic attacks on nationals from other African countries are fresh in mind, the contributions of the Frontline States as they were known – Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe – to South Africa is celebrated. Curated by Ingrid Sinclair and Simon Bright, the exhibition was conceptualised a year ago.The centre said these states bore the brunt of the apartheid government’s military might. Many lives were lost for those nations’ daring to protect and host anti-apartheid activists and soldiers. It is a stark contrast to the recent xenophobic attacks.Sparse but effectiveSinclair told the national weekly newspaper, the Sunday Times, that because the Mandela Centre was not big, she wanted to show how people were affected. She did not want to show the battles, dates, generals and leaders. “I chose photographs that grabbed me in one way or another and it was quite a personal thing,” she explained.It was a “story of an onslaught against whole countries that were invaded, occupied, destabilised; millions of refugees, hundreds of thousands of people killed; countries impoverished and corrupted by the destruction of vital resources, long drawn-out wars, all caused by apartheid South Africa”.High price paidThe New Yorker magazine noted that the South African government wreaked havoc on these countries for their role in the anti-apartheid movement. “Some of the images are brutal,” wrote Jeremy Harding, “an open pit of bodies at Cassinga, in Angola, where the South African Air Force bombed a Namibian refugee camp in 1978, killing six hundred people; the bullet-ridden dead in an ANC safe house in Lesotho after a South African undercover raid in 1982.” There are also images of those injured or killed in destabilisation efforts.Harding observed there were also photographs of “railways sabotaged, buses ambushed, and limbs lost to landmines” in Mozambique and Angola. “By the time South Africa pulled out of Angola, there were at least five hundred thousand dead and four million displaced from their homes. In Mozambique the figures were higher.”But there are also lighter moments on display at the exhibition. Harding said one of his own photos, from Angola in 1988, showed soldiers playing around a captured South African tank. Another image, taken by Joel Chiziane, showed a smiling Mozambican man holding a fully grown pumpkin. “He holds an enormous squash plant, outclassed only by the glory of his smile,” wrote Harding. “It’s safe, at last, to work on the land.” It was taken at the end of a 15-year war.On the Frontline-New exhibition remembers cost carried in fighting for South Africas freedom https://t.co/56XD8pMx0M pic.twitter.com/J1lmQTlJgA— NelsonMandela (@NelsonMandela) April 27, 2015Conversation on xenophobiaThe Centre of Memory also hosted a day-long dialogue on xenophobia when it launched the exhibition. Graça Machel, Mandela’s wife, spoke at the event: “Our leadership has betrayed the dream – all of them. They betrayed the dream, they are not showing us the leadership.”She asked how the dream could be rebuilt to create another Frontline and urged everyone to take responsibility for what had happened and to understand that those committing acts of xenophobic violence were “people who are struggling for survival themselves. They have been pushed to the limit.”Max Sisulu, the son of the late anti-apartheid veterans Walter and Albertina Sisulu, recalled how he found a home away from home in every part of Southern Africa after he went into exile alongside his mother. The exhibition was a fitting tribute to those who “gave me accommodation, they gave me space, they gave me warmth and friendship”.See it yourselfThe exhibition will be at the Nelson Mandela Foundation Centre of Memory in Johannesburg until mid-July.‘On the Frontline’ photographic exhibition launches at the #NelsonMandela Foundation https://t.co/u8H7K2GZcy pic.twitter.com/NI8ic4bjWg— NelsonMandela (@NelsonMandela) May 8, 2015Went to opening of On the Frontline exhibition at Nelson Mandela Foundation, Joburg. Brutally frank struggle-era photos from SA’s neighbours— David Smith (@SmithInAfrica) May 7, 2015Photo exhibit “On the Frontline” celebrates southern African nations’ solidarity in antiapartheid struggle. https://t.co/GD1mCbxZug— Peter Alegi (@futbolprof) May 8, 2015last_img read more

Read more