Every one of the countrys biggest companies shoul

first_imgEvery one of the country’s biggest companies should ensure they have a “disability champion” on their board by 2020, according to a new report co-authored by a leading disabled social entrepreneur.The report also calls on the boards of Britain’s biggest 350 businesses to include disability as a formal agenda item at least once every year.Leading From The Front is a review of research and best practice in the field of disability, and has been written “with a board-level audience in mind”.Its co-authors are Mike Adams, the disabled chief executive of the social enterprise Purple – formerly Essex Coalition of Disabled People – and David Gracie, director of legal services at the accountancy and consultancy giant KPMG.They conclude that becoming “disability inclusive” as an employer opens up organisations to “a wider talent pool, different ways of doing things and a far broader customer base”.As well as appointing a board-level champion who is accountable for disability issues and regularly tabling disability as an agenda item, employers should also promote disability issues to their suppliers, networks and audiences, they say.They also say that employers should sign up to the government’s much-criticised Disability Confident scheme. Adams himself has previously raised concerns about how the scheme was working.The report also says that large employers – both in the private and public sector – should use their power to bring about permanent change in the way their suppliers address disability.And it says employers should secure the right specialist support on disability, to help them “navigate those potentially tricky first conversations and get the right policies in place from the very start”.The report says the value of the “purple pound” – the collective spending power of disabled people in the UK and their families – is an estimated £249 billion a year.It says that three-quarters of disabled people have walked away from a business because of poor disability awareness – costing businesses £420 million a week – while inaccessible websites and apps cost £11.75 billion in lost revenue in the UK in 2016.And it says that one academic study found 92 per cent of consumers felt more positive about companies that employed disabled people.But it also points out that less than one in 10 businesses have a defined strategy for targeting disabled consumers.The report says that Mars UK saw sales of Maltesers increase by 8.1 per cent – double its target of four per cent – after a series of adverts featuring disabled cast members (pictured), in its most successful campaign in 80 years.Agnes Fletcher, an equality advisor to Arsenal, which became the first professional football club to achieve Disability Confident “leader” status, spoke in the report of the Arsenal For Everyone initiative, which includes a long-term commitment to disability.The club’s management team take the lead on diversity, with the initiative promoted at every level of the organisation, helping staff understand the importance of disability issues, she says in the report.Fletcher, a former director of policy and communications at the Disability Rights Commission, says: “Being open about these issues also benefits Arsenal’s employer brand and status as an inclusive place to work.“The latest equality and diversity survey showed that more employees and casual staff are identifying themselves as disabled.“So being disability inclusive doesn’t just open up Arsenal to a bigger fanbase but a wider talent pool too.”Sarah Newton, minister for disabled people, said that about 6,000 employers had now signed up to Disability Confident, which aims to challenge employers’ attitudes towards disability and help remove workplace barriers faced by disabled people.She said that if an employer signs up to Disability Confident it “sends a powerful message to potential employees that they will get the support they need to thrive in the workplace”.She said: “Disability Confident can offer your organisation a valuable support network and guidance to help you create a more inclusive workplace.”The report says that most of the experts interviewed for the review spoke about the importance of the people at the top of organisations “setting the right tone” on disability.Adams said: “Put simply, disability is board business. It affects everyone associated with your company – your customers, your staff, and your stakeholders.“Having spoken to some of the most forward-thinking businesses of all sizes when it comes to disability, a common thread quickly emerged – the tone is set by those at the top.“We need more leaders to follow suit and create a new culture in which disabled people aren’t just accommodated but embraced because everyone understands their true potential.”last_img read more

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Controversial displacement study leads to strife between Planning Department Mission antigentrification activists

first_imgA controversial study — until now largely unseen — has sparked discord between the San Francisco Planning Department and Mission District anti-gentrification activists.  The report, completed in early June by a UC Berkeley Ph.D graduate student in economics named Kate Pennington, asserts that the probability of being legally evicted does not increase for tenants residing within a kilometer of new construction in San Francisco. In some cases, the study concludes, new construction might actually decrease the chances that a legal eviction notice is served in its close proximity. The study’s conclusion is anathema to the deeply held beliefs of Mission anti-gentrification advocates, whose everyday work is based on the notion — which they say is supported by a preponderance of anecdotal evidence — that new market-rate development is a driver of displacement. So it is not surprising that Mission District activists have come out swinging.  And, coincidentally or not, the report has yet to be widely released or publicized by the city. Planning Department spokeswoman Gina Simi, however, denied that the city has buried the report. Rather, “the department does not have a practice of making intern projects publicly available.” To obtain a copy of the report, one would have to know of its existence and request a copy, as Mission Local did. The study’s critics have complained that it is “incomplete,” only a “draft” and does not differentiate the racial and economic status of evicted tenants.“What they’re studying is legally noticed Rent Board evictions, and that’s a very narrow slice of the displacement pie,” said Peter Papadopoulos, a policy analyst with the Mission Economic Development Agency, a nonprofit that works with residents and small businesses, and also acts as a housing developer in the Mission. The Planning Department, however, is standing by the study. Nobody denies that the report focuses exclusively on legal evictions — which, while only one measure of displacement, is often used in studies such as the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project and various others.“Ms. Pennington’s work is important and high-caliber,” AnMarie Rodgers, the director of citywide planning, wrote Mission Local in an email. ‘There is no evidence that legal eviction became more likely … ’Pennington’s analysis is narrowly focused on whether new construction increases the likelihood of receiving an eviction notice. She drew data from eviction notices submitted to the San Francisco Rent Board as well as those filed with San Francisco Superior Court from 2003 to 2017, and then matched them up with projects constructed in the same period.She tested for three variables: whether evictions are influenced by proximity to the project, neighborhood characteristics, and whether the project is market-rate or affordable — all over the five years before and after a project is built. Ultimately, she concludes: “I find that new construction does not increase the likelihood of legal eviction. This is true not only for market-rate housing, but also for affordable housing and building replacements. It is true in all neighborhoods, from the Mission to the Outer Richmond.”Furthermore, Pennington found that a unit located within a quarter-kilometer of a new project is a quarter of a percentage point less likely to receive an eviction notice three years after the project was built.“This offers evidence of a mild supply effect, with building more housing helping to reduce the likelihood of legal eviction over time,” Pennington writes. Department denies burying a report claiming new construction doesn’t lead to evictions KryptoniteAnti-gentrification activists are not happy with the study’s conclusions. Market-rate development “contributes to direct displacement because landlords cannot resist the lure of higher rents and therefore employ various means to get tenants out … ” Scott Weaver, a lawyer for the merchants association Calle 24 wrote in a May 16 letter to Planning Department Director John Rahaim. The letter essentially warns that the city department might humiliate itself by focusing on such a narrow set of data. “Reliance on Rent Board Notices in making any conclusions will cast serious doubts on this study,” Weaver wrote. Alternately, Pennington’s report could serve as a cudgel for the city’s YIMBY (Yes In My Back Yard) faction, which fervently advocates for a glut of new construction at all levels of affordability.  Papadopoulos, the MEDA policy analyst, said the danger of the report — which he insists is incomplete without culturally sensitive data, such as the income levels and demographics of the displaced parties, is “that we end up with unsound policies that have unintended displacement impacts on the same very vulnerable residents who are not captured in the study.”   This is not the first time the Planning Department has heard this complaint. The department, in fact, consulted with these very activists about the study as it was being conducted. Their concerns, throughout the process, were the same: The study is too narrowly focused and leaves out those who might be disproportionately affected by evictions.Latest contentious chapterPennington’s report, titled “The Impact of housing Production on Legal Eviction in San Francisco,” is a contribution to an ongoing — and extremely heated — debate over whether the construction of market-rate housing contributes to displacement amid an ongoing housing and affordability crisis throughout the Bay Area. It builds on previous studies that assert new construction does not contribute to gentrification and displacement — in particular, a 2016 study by the UC Berkeley Urban Displacement Project that, in part, concluded that market-rate development had an “insignificant effect on displacement,” as well as a study by the California Legislative Budget Analyst that the construction of market-rate development is the best solution easing displacement pressure on low-income households. Although these studies concluded that new residential development does not contribute to displacement — and actually eases housing prices at the regional level — neither one measured the so-called “spillover” effects of new development at the neighborhood level — meaning whether the neighborhoods are distinctly impacted by new construction. That’s where this most recent Planning Department study comes in, measuring the probability of legal eviction notices near new development at the block-to-block level. In addition to their complaint that the study potentially negates disproportionate hardships heaped upon poor minorities, activists also say the study is based on incomplete data. Weaver, the Calle 24 lawyer, noted that the study does not measure the “nonpayment” evictions that are not submitted to the Rent Board. “These non-payments (evictions) constitute anywhere from 40 percent to 60 percent of all just-cause evictions and more likely disproportionately impact poorer communities,” he said in an email. Pennington says Weaver is correct that not all nonpayment evictions were measured in the study, since many of them are not documented. However, she says some 5,000 of them were included, as they were either filed with the Rent Board or included in court filings. And Pennington stressed that the study does not claim to capture all forms of displacement. The paper, she said, focuses on just one thing: the effect of new construction on legal evictions. “The study acknowledges and discusses ways in which these data do not capture the full universe of eviction events in San Francisco,” she said in an email. “And [it] suggests that, for this reason, the results here should be thought of as [just one indicator of] the impact of new market-rate construction on eviction.” She said she intends to expand on the study by tracking the effects of new development on neighborhood-level rental prices — one of the indicators her critics felt was missing from this first study. That research, she said, is already underway. center_img Subscribe to Mission Local’s daily newsletter Email Addresslast_img read more

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ALEX Walmsley scooped a plethora of awards at Sain

first_imgALEX Walmsley scooped a plethora of awards at Saints End of Season Dinner – which was sponsored by Robinsons Brewery and the Roofing Consultants Group.The big forward was named the Club’s Player of the Year as well as Players’ Player of the Year and Founder Members Player of the Year.He said: “This is a great honour and a real shock. We have a great team at St Helens and to be honoured by my teammates, my friends and the fans, is superb.“I’m fortunate enough to be in a profession that was my childhood dream and be at a prestigious club too. I’m playing with the likes of Jon Wilkin and James Roby and learning all the time. Keiron has done a lot of work with me and I am appreciative of everything he has done.”Elsewhere, Mark Percival and Andre Savelio were given the Founder Members Player of the Year and the Club’s Player of the Year respectively whilst Jordan Olmez and Morgan Knowles won the 16s and 19s gongs.There were also mementos for Kel Coslett and Phil White who are retiring from their roles at the club.Award Winners:Cultivate Creative U16s Scholarship Player of the Year: Jordan Olmez2Kleen Under 19s Player of the Year: Morgan KnowlesFounder Members Young Player of the Year: Mark PercivalFounder Members Player of the Year: Alex WalmsleyPlayers’ Player of the Year: Alex WalmsleyRoofing Consultants Group Young Player of the Year: Andre Savelio Robinsons Runner up Player of the Year: James RobyRobinsons Player of the Year: Alex Walmsleylast_img read more

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First Team Match

first_imgSmith, fresh from signing his contract extension at the club, is included in the 19 after missing out in the win over Hull KR last week as Jack Welsby is left out.James Roby, who talked this week about his fond memories of Wembley is named and will be looking to lead Saints into the quarter final, with the draw being made after Wigan Warriors clash with Warrington Wolves, live on BBC.Matty Costello retains his place and Adam Swift is included again. Once again Holbrook has the luxury to pick from three halves with Danny Richardson, Theo Fages and Jonny Lomax all named.Luke Thompson, Mark Percival and Louie McCarthy-Scarsbrook are still out with injury. ————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–St.Helens 19 man squad:1. Jonny Lomax, 2. Tommy Makinson, 3. Kevin Naiqama, 5. Regan Grace, 6. Theo Fages, 7. Danny Richardson, 8. Alex Walmsley, 9. James Roby, 11. Zeb Taia, 12. Joseph Paulo, 15. Morgan Knowles, 16. Kyle Amor, 17. Dom Peyroux, 18. Adam Swift, 19. Matty Lees, 20. Jack Ashworth, 21. Aaron Smith, 23. Lachlan Coote 24. Matty Costello.Giants 19 man squad:1. Darnell McIntosh, 2. Jermaine McGillvary, 4. Jordan Turner, 6. Lee Gaskell, 7. Matt Frawley, 8. Paul Clough, 9. Kruise Leeming, 10. Suaia Matagi, 11. Aaron Murphy, 12. Alex Mellor, 14. Adam O’Brien, 15. Oliver Roberts, 17. Ukuma Ta’ai, 19. Matty English, 23. Oliver Russell, 29. Sam Hewitt, 31. Louis Senior, 32. Innes Senior, 35. Joe Wardle.Tickets for Saints’ Coral Challenge Cup Round Six clash with the Huddersfield Giants at the John Smith’s Stadium on Sunday (kick off 6:05pm) are on sale from just £10 for adults. Click here for more information.last_img read more

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Man pleads guilty to selling heroin near Wilmington school

first_imgMichael Rahee Walker (Photo: NHC District Attorney’s Office) WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — A Wilmington man plead guilty to multiple charges Wednesday including selling heroin near DC Virgo Middle School.Michael Rahee Walker, 25, entered pleas of guilty for the illegal possession of a firearm as a convicted felon, possession of a stolen firearm, selling  and delivering a controlled substance within 1000 feet of a school, and selling heroin in New Hanover County Superior Court.- Advertisement – Walker was sentenced to 2-4 years in prison.Last November, officers with the New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office and the Wilmington Police Department were patrolling the Hillcrest community. Officers detected a strong odor of marijuana coming from the car where Walker was sitting. During a vehicle search, officers located two firearms. Walker admitted that a Glock handgun located and seized from underneath the front passenger seat belonged to him. This firearm had been reported stolen out of Horry County, SC.Walker had previously been convicted of possession with the intent to sell and deliver a schedule one controlled substance on April 2013.Related Article: Dunkin’ Donuts loses food service permit due to health violationOn January 6, officers with the City County Task Force saw Walker at the corner of Brown and Nixon Streets in what appeared to be a drug deal. After a brief foot pursuit, officers detained Walker and seized eight bindles of heroin. The location at the corner of Brown and Nixon Streets is within 1,000 feet of DC Virgo Middle School.Walker may be eligible for habitual felon status if he commits a felony upon his release from prison.last_img read more

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Man facing slew of drug charges following 2month investigation

first_img NHSO says Turner was stopped on Martin Luther King Jr Parkway and was found to be in possession of trafficking amounts of heroin, cocaine and crack cocaine.Detectives searched Turner’s home located on Walnut Street and found an additional trafficking amount of heroin, marijuana and manufacturing aids. Detectives also found a loaded handgun.Deputies say there was approximately 1,000 grams of cocaine, 31 grams of heroin, over 950 bindles of heroin and 15 grams of marijuana.Related Article: 3 charged in toppling of Confederate statue ‘Silent Sam’Turner is being held at the New Hanover County Detention Facility under the following charges:Trafficking heroin by possessionTrafficking heroin by manufacturingTrafficking heroin by transportationTrafficking cocaine by possessionTrafficking cocaine by transportationTrafficking cocaine by manufacturingPWIMSD heroinManufacturing heroinManufacturing cocainePWIMSD cocainePWIMSD marijuanaManufacturing marijuanaPossession of firearm by a convicted felonMaintaining a dwellingMaintaining a vehicleSimple possession of marijuanaPossession of drug paraphernalia Gerick Diwell Turner was arrested on September 4, 2018 for drug charges. (Photo: NHSO) WILMINGTON,NC (WWAY) — A Wilmington man was arrested after a 2-month long drug investigation by the New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office.Detectives arrested Gerick Diwell Turner, 40, in Wilmington late Tuesday night.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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GOP candidate Board change limits chance of new election

first_img The board was investigating alleged ballot fraud by an operative hired by the Harris’ campaign.A five-member board with three Democrats and two Republicans is expected to be named by Jan. 31. The law then requires that four of the members vote to order a new election.But three members also must vote to certify the election. Unofficial returns show Harris defeated Democrat Dan McCready by 905 votes in the 9th District race. Mark Harris (Photo: WBTV) CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — The Republican in the nation’s last undecided congressional race says he believes changes to North Carolina’s elections board mean a new election is less likely.Mark Harris told The Charlotte Observer on Friday he believes the possibility of new election “dropped significantly” when a judicial panel last month dissolved the nine-member State Board of Elections and Ethics Enforcement.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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Yahoo shuts down early web search engine AltaVista

first_imgAdvertisement Yesterday, Yahoo Inc. sent AltaVista.com to the Internet graveyard to rest alongside order-almost-anything venture Kozmo.com and the butler from Ask Jeeves. The once popular search engine  lost ground with the rise of Google and was purchased in 2003 by Yahoo!, which retained the brand but based all AltaVista searches on its own search engine.AltaVista was introduced in 1995, three years before Google Inc. was founded. Eclipsed by Google in the early 2000s, AltaVista’s star had already faded by the time Yahoo acquired it as part of its $1.7 billion purchase of Overture Services Inc. in July 2003. Overture had bought AltaVista earlier that year from Massachusetts-based CMGI Inc.[related-posts] – Advertisement – Yahoo announced AltaVista’s fate on its Tumblr page late last month. Search industry expert Danny Sullivan likened AltaVista to a bright child neglected by its parents.“You were loved. You really were,” Sullivan wrote in a blog post eulogizing the site. “People did not want to leave you. But despite adding new features, some of which Google copied, you couldn’t keep up with the pace and innovation of that company, which decided against becoming a portal like your corporate masters ordered for you.”Indeed, AltaVista’s decline began after it expanded to become more like Yahoo, offering a bevy of online services instead of sticking solely with search. By the time the site reversed course, it was too late. Its finances were sinking and Google was on the rise.Yahoo’s June 28 announcement of AltaVista’s end is brief. It’s buried as the eighth item on a list of other services the company is shutting down. Along with the mention of AltaVista’s July 8 expiration date, the post says only: “Please visit Yahoo Search for all of your searching needs.”According to data from online research firm comScore, most people in the U.S. use Google for their search needs, followed by Microsoft’s Bing. Yahoo is in third place.Source: 9Newslast_img read more

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The experts speak on whether internet access can truly go global

first_imgThe experts speak on whether internet access can truly go global. Image Credit: Phys Advertisement RAMA MWENESI Founder, E-MAGINE The work of tech giants will make internet globally available, but not necessarily accessible or affordable. Will their projects involve local communities and benefit them?E-magine began in 2009/10 and is working locally to increase internet access in underserved areas. We have eight projects in four countries – Zambia, Kenya, Sierra Leone and Brazil – and are seeing great results that help to understand how people are adopting technology.MIKE CASSIDY Vice president , Project Loon, Google Two-thirds of the world’s population does not have internet. For those in rural or hard-to-reach areas, getting it is challenging. – Advertisement – Project Loon is a network of balloons which float in the stratosphere, twice as high as aeroplanes. By partnering with telecom companies we can reach much further out into rural and remote areas of a country in a cost-effective way. Our balloons can last over 100 days and travel over 17m km collectively. From one balloon we can now provide coverage to an area approximately the size of Rhode Island (4,000 sq km) — that’s four times larger than our previous coverage area.By taking to the air, we can get rid of connectivity problems and provide internet to billions of people who don’t have it.[related-posts]MARIYA ZEHLEVA Advertisement Assistant professor in the department of computer science at University at Albany, New York I hope that internet connection will become worldwide. However, I am not sure if we will ever reach the point where everyone has the same online experience. Rural residents are quick to realise how mobile phones, SMS and internet can benefit them. They no longer need to take unnecessary trips to the town, they can check what is a fair price to sell their crops, buy used cars from Japan and they can stay in touch through, say, Facebook. Rural residents use the internet much like those who live in cities.Connectivity depends on infrastructure, which is concentrated in cities. So there is a need for alternative solutions. Academia and industry are making good progress in creating infrastructure-less cellular and areal networks, and using unused broadcasting frequencies (TV white space, also known as TVWS). Technological progress, however, is not the only factor for improved rural connectivity. Understanding of people’s needs along with favourable policy is crucial to achieving universal connectivity.AMY O’DONNELL ICT in programme lead, Oxfam The internet is a catalyst for the way people communicate, access information and gain opportunities. It is a concern that the digital divide pervades – giving voice to those who already have it, while disproportionately excluding the marginalised. Promisingly, many providers are seeing the opportunity to reach those who still do not have internet connectivity.But focus needs to shift from accessibility to the meaningful use of the internet. Are local communities involved in generating content to make it useful for them? Are services suitable for the needs of specific groups such as women and do they tackle barriers such as illiteracy?Oxfam is trying to use the internet to increase people’s access to meaningful information that can improve their opportunities and livelihoods. Internet Now! is running in 100 communities in Uganda. These are small computer centres that employ young people affected by conflict from the Lord’s Resistance Army, while giving them access to an agricultural commodity platform – information which is very valuable to their community. [The Guardian]last_img read more

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Google To Offer Bounty Hunters USD200000 For Finding Any Android bug

first_imgBusinessman using smart phone to pay for his online products.(Photo Courtesy) Advertisement Hoping to attract more researchers and engineers to the bug bounty programme, US-based internet search firm, Google Corp. according to media report has increased its bounty to USD$200,000. This follows after a malware called Judy hit over 36.5 million Android-based phones, hence prompting the search firm to increase the bounty for finding a bug in Android Operating System (OS).Judy is one such case of how an open and free mobile operating system (OS) can be exploited by malicious app developers.According to Check Point, dozens of malicious apps were downloaded between 4.5 million to 18.5 million times from the Play Store. Some of the malware-affected apps have been discovered residing on the online store for several years. – Advertisement – Most security flaws we hear about now affect old builds of the OS or require clever social engineering to get the user to weaken device security, ExtremeTech reported on Friday.The versions of Android being released now are more secure than what Google was putting out years ago and as a result no one has managed to claim Google’s largest bug bounties for Android.Notably, Google started the bug bounty programme for Android about two years ago in which the security researchers, who demonstrate an exploit, get a cash prize — the amount of which varies based on the severity of the hack. Then, Google gets to fix the bug and avoid future security issues.last_img read more

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