Kings to play sans Slaughter

first_imgSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND We are young MOST READ 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas With Ferrer aboard, the Kings’ main strength would continue to be its backcourt as Scottie Thompson will undoubtedly be a better player after earning his spurs as a rookie last season.LA Tenorio is at the prime of his career with former MVPs Mark Caguioa and Jay-Jay Helterbrand having second winds in the last conference.While Tim Cone would need to plug a huge hole in the middle for the Kings, the Beermen have gotten stronger in that spot after tabbing Arnold Van Opstal from the Cadet pool to give Fajardo a more dependable back-up.San Miguel, which starts seeking a third straight all-Filipino on Sunday against sister team Star, is loaded on all fronts with Arwind Santos leading a talented forward rotation that also has Marcio Lassiter.Alex Cabagnot and Chris Ross could be as good as any point guard tandem in the league, no offense to the offensive potential of GlobalPort’s Terrence Romeo and Stanley Pringle, as both can also play defense and shut down their counterparts.ADVERTISEMENT Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esportscenter_img EDITORS’ PICK Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 McIlroy-Johnson match shelved As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise Slaughter recently signed a maximum three-year renewal with Ginebra despite recovering from surgery to repair a torn ACL, but is not expected back until late in the Commissioner’s Cup eliminations.And that would leave the Kings without possibly the second best center in the league behind only the Beermen’s own behemoth, reigning three-time MVP June Mar Fajardo.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agentGinebra was able to strengthen its forward rotation with the acquisition of former Santo Tomas ace Kevin Ferrer from the special Gilas Cadet Draft and would have great use for Slaughter in the Philippine Cup if he were healthy.Fajardo won a third straight MVP last season by dominating action in the Philippine Cup, being too strong, quicker and younger than the other big men in the league. PBA IMAGESBarangay Ginebra finally came to terms with its 7-foot cornerstone, but the Gin Kings will be gunning for a second straight title starting next week still without Greg Slaughter.The Kings, the Governors’ Cup champions, are installed as darkhorses in the opening conference of Season 42 of the PBA—which starts Sunday with the Philippine Cup at Smart Araneta Coliseum in Cubao—as Slaughter, though with a fresh deal, will be returning late in the next conference at the earliest.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

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Tokyo breaks ground on new 2020 Olympics National Stadium

first_imgSmart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports In this Dec. 22, 2015 file photo, Japanese architect Kengo Kuma speaks during a press conference after his design for the 2020 Tokyo Olympic stadium was picked in Tokyo. Tokyo held a groundbreaking ceremony on Sunday, Dec. 11, 2016, for a $1.5 billion new National Stadium to host the 2020 Olympic Games. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi, File)TOKYO — Tokyo held a groundbreaking ceremony on Sunday for a $1.5 billion National Stadium to host the 2020 Olympic Games.Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, Tokyo Gov. Yuriko Koike and other dignitaries launched the construction at the site of the demolished National Stadium, which was used during the 1964 Tokyo Olympics, by putting their hands on a glass sphere that rotated through pastels of the colors of the Olympic logo.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Senators to proceed with review of VFA We are young Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND EDITORS’ PICK Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Russia accepts IOC plan to retest Olympic doping samples PH among economies most vulnerable to viruscenter_img Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Ginebra teammates show love for Slaughter Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine The ceremony ended with a video replete with computer graphics showing how the stadium is expected to look and function once completed by November 2019.Work on the stadium in the center of the city fell behind schedule because the government abandoned the original design amid spiraling costs and complaints over its scale and appearance.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad AliKoike, Tokyo’s first female governor, took office in July pledging to use her platform to host a cost-efficient and environmentally friendly 2020 Olympics. She has lambasted organizers of the 2020 games for failing to keep costs under control.An expert panel she appointed put the price tag of the 2020 Games at over $30 billion, barring drastic cost-cutting measures, a more than a four-fold increase from the initial estimate when the city was awarded the games in 2013. MOST READ Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Fans of the old stadium, built in the late 1950s, had lobbied to keep and renovate it. But in the end the government opted to replace it with a more modern facility.Kengo Kuma, the architect of the new, open-air stadium, chose a wooden lattice design that echoes traditional styles seen in Japanese shrines and pagodas. It is intended to blend in with surrounding parkland and will be structured to minimize costs for heating and cooling.The structure will use Japanese-grown larch in its wood and steel composite roof and prefabricated panels to help speed the work along and contain costs.ADVERTISEMENT As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise View commentslast_img read more

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Lyceum blanks EAC for share of 2nd in NCAA volleyball

first_imgSmart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports Despite the win, the Lady Pirates head coach Emil Lontoc was not at all satisfied with how his team played, citing his team’s inexperience in handling pressure-packed scenarios.“I think we should step up more because I can’t see the things we see in practice during our games,” said Lontoc who has four rookies in his lineup.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad AliSPORTSWe are young“I can say that my players are still inexperienced.”Lyceum enjoyed a three-pronged attack from captain Cherilyn Sindayen, Pauline Orros, and Christine Miralles who all had 12 points while La Rainne Fabay added 10 points. Serena bundled out of Auckland Classic Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Ginebra teammates show love for Slaughter Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes MOST READ Jaylene Lumbo was the lone bright spot for the 0-6 Lady Generals as she finished with 11 points.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next EDITORS’ PICK Senators to proceed with review of VFA We are young Lyceum Lady Pirates. Photo by Bong LozadaLyceum marched on to the New Year with a convincing three-set victory over hapless Emilio Aguinaldo College, 25-20, 25-23, 25-20, in the NCAA Season 90 women’s volleyball tournament Wednesday at San Juan Arena.The Lady Pirates upped their record to 5-1, joining defending champion St. Benilde at second seed behind the unbeaten leader San Sebastian, which holds a 7-0 slate.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Alyssa Valdez stays positive despite PH loss in volleyball opener PLAY LIST 01:14Alyssa Valdez stays positive despite PH loss in volleyball opener00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND View commentslast_img read more

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Criminalization and violence increasingly used to silence indigenous protest, according to UN report

first_imgDevelopment, Endangered Environmentalists, Environment, Human Rights, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Land Rights, Law Enforcement, Murdered Activists, Private sector, Research, Violence Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Indigenous peoples are facing criminalization and violence the world over, tactics employed by private businesses and governments seeking to use indigenous lands for their own gain through economic development projects, according to a report submitted to the UN Human Rights Council on August 27.UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Victoria Tauli-Corpuz said she has seen firsthand a sharp rise in instances of physical violence and legal prosecution against indigenous peoples in countries like Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, India, Kenya, Mexico, Peru, and the Philippines since her appointment as Special Rapporteur in 2014.The Special Rapporteur identifies lack of official recognition of indigenous peoples’ land rights as one of the root causes of violence, sometimes even leading to indigenous communities being treated as trespassers on their own traditional territories. After the Seko indigenous peoples of Indonesia rejected a plan to build a hydropower plant on their traditional lands in the province of South Sulawesi, the company behind the plant and the local government responded with intimidation and violence, according to the Alliance of Indigenous Peoples of the Archipelago (AMAN).Eventually, 14 Seko community members were arrested and served time, while 14 others are still on a “wanted list.” At one point, the police reportedly threatened to arrest all of the men in the Seko village if protests continued. Women and children have also experienced violence as a result of the community’s opposition to the hydropower project, AMAN said.The Seko are certainly not alone in being portrayed as criminals and targeted with violent reprisals after standing up for their rights and lands. Indigenous peoples are facing criminalization and violence the world over, tactics employed by private businesses and governments seeking to use indigenous lands for their own gain through economic development projects.Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, submitted a report with that finding to the UN Human Rights Council on August 27. Tauli-Corpuz said she has seen firsthand a sharp rise in instances of physical violence and legal prosecution against indigenous peoples in countries like Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, India, Kenya, Mexico, Peru, and the Philippines since her appointment as Special Rapporteur in 2014.“I’ve been alerted to hundreds of criminalization cases from nearly every corner of the world,” Tauli-Corpuz said in a statement. “The rapid expansion of development projects on indigenous lands without their consent is driving a global crisis. These attacks — whether physical or legal — are an attempt to silence Indigenous Peoples voicing their opposition to projects that threaten their livelihoods and cultures.”Tauli-Corpuz’s findings on violence against indigenous activists are consistent with those of a report released in July by the NGO Global Witness that found indigenous peoples make up a disproportionate number of those killed in retaliation for their activism — a number that has continually risen in recent years. In 2017, 25 percent of the murders of land and environment defenders recorded by Global Witness were indigenous activists, though indigenous peoples represent just 5 percent of the global population.A pattern of criminalizationAccording to the Special Rapporteur’s report, criminalization of indigenous peoples usually follows an established pattern. The report states: “While the killing of indigenous defenders represents the worst human rights violation, such attacks tend to occur in the context of violence and threats against them and their communities, including enforced disappearances, forced evictions, judicial harassment, arbitrary arrests and detention, limitations to the freedom of expression and freedom of assembly, stigmatization, surveillance, travel bans and sexual harassment.”Tauli-Corpuz found that before criminal charges are brought, defamation and smear campaigns are often directed at indigenous communities and leaders through channels such as social media, casting them as anti-development and accusing them of acting against the national interest. “Defamation campaigns are often developed by business actors, with the overt or covert support of corrupt government officials whose financial interests are affected by indigenous peoples’ defence of their lands,” Tauli-Corpuz writes.When criminal complaints are officially brought against indigenous activists and leaders, they are usually “broad and ill-defined” charges such as trespassing, aggravated usurpation, conspiracy, kidnapping, coercion, public disturbance, and incitement. “It is widely reported that states of emergency are declared to suspend judicial guarantees and justify the suppression of peaceful social protests,” per the report.Arrest warrants are repeatedly issued for indigenous peoples — or even whole communities — despite a lack of evidence, the report adds. Meanwhile, the prosecution of indigenous individuals frequently ignores procedural norms, leading to abuses like pre-trial detention of the accused lasting for several years and indigenous defendants having no access to legal counsel or even interpreters in order to adequately mount a defense.Lack of land rights a root cause of violenceThe Special Rapporteur identifies lack of official recognition of indigenous peoples’ land rights as one of the root causes of violence, sometimes even leading to indigenous communities being treated as trespassers on their own traditional territories.The World Resources Institute reported earlier this year that addressing the lack of land title for indigenous communities is often impeded by the fact that the process to formalize their land rights is so costly and complex that it can take as long as 30 years — yet companies can secure long-term rights to land in as little as 30 days.The NGO Rights and Resources International (RRI) estimates that indigenous peoples have legally recognized rights to just 10 percent of the world’s land, though they control as much as 65 percent through customary, community-based tenure systems.Anne-Sophie Gindroz, RRI’s facilitator for South East Asia, said that the law isn’t only failing indigenous communities when it comes to awarding them title to their traditional lands. Perpetrators of violence are rarely brought to justice, she said, as there is widespread impunity for those who commit violence against indigenous peoples.“At the same time, justice systems can be used against indigenous human rights defenders,” Gindroz added. “In Indonesia, for example, people have been arrested for remaining on their land after it was granted to palm oil companies by the government.”As the Special Rapporteur’s report shows, violence and criminalization are not reserved solely for the indigenous activists standing up to protect their people’s lands. Lawyers and civil society advocates who work with indigenous peoples are often targets, as well. Gindroz herself was expelled from the Lao People’s Democratic Republic for her advocacy work.It’s not just economic development that is being used as an excuse to criminalize indigenous protest, either. While the majority of the cases documented by the Special Rapporteur involved opposition to business interests, in some instances conservation efforts were used to justify the criminalization of indigenous communities living traditional lifestyles, leading to arrests, forced evictions, and other violations of human rights.For instance, “Conservation has been given as an excuse for escalating violence against the Sengwer Indigenous Peoples living within their ancestral lands in the Embobut forest in Kenya,” according to Yator Kiptum, executive coordinator of the Sengwer Indigenous Peoples Programme. “Some have even been killed. The Kenyan Forest Service has repeatedly forcefully evicted and burned Sengwer homes and arrested community members — in spite of the fact that the court issued an injunction to prevent such evictions.”Andrew Anderson, executive director of the Front Line Defenders NGO, said in a statement that “What is happening now across the world is nothing less than a systematic attack on peasant communities and Indigenous Peoples.” Front Line Defenders documented 312 murders of human rights advocates last year, 67 percent of which were in response to people defending their lands, the environment, or indigenous rights from private sector mega-projects and extractive industries.“In their insatiable greed for wood and oil and gold, corrupt elites, who have no ambition beyond their own enrichment, risk not only destroying the lives and culture of Indigenous Peoples, but also destroying the environment on which our collective future survival depends,” Anderson said.Indigenous activists with the Guardians of the Forest coalition take part in the Rise For Climate day of action in San Francsco, California on September 8, 2018. Photo Credit: Joel Redman/If Not Us Then Who.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

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Peccary’s disappearance foreboding for other Mesoamerican wildlife

first_imgA multinational team of scientists met to discuss the current status and future of the white-lipped peccary, a pig-like mammal that lives in Central and South America.White-lipped peccaries no longer live in 87 percent of their former range, driven out largely by hunting and habitat loss.The scientists say the disappearance of this species, which requires large tracts of unbroken forest, could portend the extinction of other wildlife. The white-lipped peccary (Tayassu pecari), a hairy, pig-like mammal that once lived throughout the forests of Central and South America, now only skitters around in 13 percent of its former range, according to a report released in November 2018.More than two-thirds of white-lipped peccary populations are on the decline, said scientists who met to discuss the future of the species in an August 2016 meeting in Belize City, Belize. That’s concerning, they warn, because peccaries are sensitive to hunting and deforestation. Thus, their disappearance could be a harbinger of the future loss of other wildlife.A camera trap nabs a group of white-lipped peccaries. Image courtesy of WCS.“No species represents the plight of the forests like the white-lipped peccary, which is now teetering at the edge of existence due to habitat loss and hunting,” Jeremy Radachowsky, an ecologist who directs the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Mesoamerica program and participated in the assessment, said in a statement. “We need to take immediate action to save Mesoamerica’s last wild places and their incredible wildlife.”The researchers, from the seven countries that still have white-lipped peccaries as well as the United States, surveyed biologists in their respective countries regarding the status of local white-lipped peccary populations. They then shared their findings with their colleagues in Belize, summarizing them in the November report.The results suggest that the animal’s current status as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List should be changed to endangered, according to the assessment. In Mexico and parts of Brazil, it’s already treated as an endangered species under the law.Hunting is a major threat to white-lipped peccaries throughout their range. Image courtesy of Honduras’s Institute of Forest Conservation (ICF) Moskitia.White-lipped peccary numbers are holding steady in only four locations, the researchers found. In one place, the Maya Mountains of Belize, the population is actually growing.Elsewhere, in Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama and Brazil, most populations are dwindling. (Scientists aren’t sure how several populations in Belize and one in Mexico are doing.) Ranching and farming have chewed through large tracts of forest, and roads pave the way for new settlements. They also aid hunters in penetrating the difficult habitats, ranging from the dense forests of the Amazon to the thorny scrub of the Gran Chaco, where white-lipped peccaries live.“Mesoamerica is home to five great forests and still harbors a miraculous spectrum of magnificent wildlife,” Radachowsky said. “However, these forests and their wildlife are at grave risk.”A small herd of peccaries, pictured here in Mexico. Image by Rafael Reyna/ECOSUR.The scientists involved say the report could guide governments and indigenous and local communities in protecting the remaining peccary habitat — and not just for the benefit of one species. They argue that the presence of white-lipped peccaries in a landscape is a sign that conservation efforts are working, since the species requires large stretches of intact forest to survive. And by protecting peccaries, land managers would also be securing the future of other mammals, such as Central American tapirs (Tapirus bairdii), jaguars (Panthera onca) and mountain lions (Puma concolor).What’s more, peccaries play important ecological roles, and some scientists postulate that they’re ecosystem engineers.“This amazing animal turns the soil, feed large cats and controls seedling growth, actually enhancing the diversity of the whole forest,” Rafael Reyna-Hurtado, a biologist at Mexico’s El Colegio de la Frontera Sur and the report’s lead author, said in the statement.Scientists believe that protections for the white-lipped peccary will extend to other species, such as tapirs, jaguars and pumas. Image by Apolinar Basora.But the researchers, all peccary experts who have spent countless hours tracking herds that can number up to 300 animals through rugged terrain, also argue that we should protect white-lipped peccaries for their own sake.“No other animal in the world moves through forests in such large groups,” Reyna-Hurtado said. “If we save it from extinction we not only protect the forest, we give our children the chance to witness a wild herd marching in a single file through the forest foraging for food, even escaping from a jaguar, just as they have done for thousands of years.”Banner image of white-lipped peccaries in a wallow by Roan McNab/WCS.CitationsBeck, H., Thebpanya, P., & Filiaggi, M. (2010). Do Neotropical peccary species (Tayassuidae) function as ecosystem engineers for anurans? Journal of Tropical Ecology, 26(4), 407-414.Keuroghlian, A., Desbiez, A., Reyna-Hurtado, R., Altrichter, M., Beck, H., Taber, A. & Fragoso, J.M.V. (2013). Tayassu pecari. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2013: e.T41778A44051115. Downloaded on 20 December 2018.Reyna-Hurtado, R., Radachowsky, J., Mcloughlin, L., Thornton, D., Moreira-Ramírez, J. F., García-Anleu, R., … Polisar, J. (2018). Rapid Decline of White-lipped Peccary Populations in Mesoamerica.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannon Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Biodiversity, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Animals, Big Cats, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Camera Trapping, Cats, Cattle Pasture, Cattle Ranching, Conservation, Deforestation, Dry Forests, Ecology, Ecosystem Engineers, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Forests, Habitat, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Hunting, Livestock, Mammals, NGOs, Over-hunting, Poaching, Protected Areas, Rainforest Agriculture, Rainforest Animals, Rainforest Biodiversity, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Ranching, Research, Roads, Threats To Rainforests, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Forests, Wcs, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Saving the forests of the Congo Basin: Q&A with author Meindert Brouwer

first_imgArticle published by John Cannon Central African Forests Forever, first published in 2017, takes readers to the heart of the continent, introducing them to the people and wildlife of this region.Its author, independent communications consultant Meindert Brouwer, says the book also functions as a tool for sharing information about efforts to address poverty and environmental issues in the region.Mongabay spoke with Brouwer to learn more about his motivations and the reception of his work in Central Africa. It was an ambitious project from the start: to capture the Congo Basin rainforest in the pages of a book. Stretching across an area larger than Saudi Arabia, the world’s second-largest rainforest straddles six countries in Central Africa. Many are crippled by corruption, civil conflict, and seemingly solution-less problems at the intersection of poverty and environmental stewardship. The loss of the Congo Basin’s forests has lurched along more slowly than in the Amazon rainforest or the jungles of Southeast Asia, but many experts worry that that trend won’t hold. The region’s growing population and the need for economic development have already led to the rising destruction of unique ecosystems to make way for farms, mines and timber plantations.Nki Falls, Nki National Park, Cameroon. Image © Jaap van der Waarde/WWF.Perhaps such a book could introduce the world to this little-known part of Africa, highlighting why it needs protection and what’s working there to improve the lives of its inhabitants, thought Meindert Brouwer. The independent communications consultant with a quarter century of experience in conservation, much of it in Central Africa, knew it would be a challenge from the start. The paradox was that because the Congo Basin is less familiar to many people than the Amazon, it would be harder to rally the support necessary to launch the project.Indeed, Brouwer said, finding an initial funder took time. But since then, the book’s momentum has led the project in new directions. Brouwer quickly saw that the value of the book, Central African Forests Forever, first planned only for digital publication, lay not just in its distribution beyond Central Africa, but within the region as well. It’s become a tool, Brouwer said, that facilitates the exchange of ideas across the heart of the continent, so much so that few copies remain of the edition in French, the lingua franca in most Congo Basin countries.Mongabay spoke with Brouwer recently from his office in the Netherlands.The village of Siniya in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Image © Joachim-Maurice Maya Kumabo/Tropenbos International.Mongabay: Why did you decide to write and put together this book in the first place?Meindert Brouwer: I was at an international climate conference, showing my [previous] book about non-timber forest products from the Amazon rainforest many years ago. This woman from Africa said, “Write a book about the Congo Basin rainforest.” And so, I said, “I will.” That’s personal — I promised her to do this. But the main reason to write his book is to raise awareness about the very existence of the Congo Basin rainforest. When you’re in the street and you mention the word “rainforest” in Europe and the United States, everybody thinks of the Amazon. Hardly anyone knows about the Congo Basin rainforest. This book is meant to make the Congo Basin rainforest better known.What questions are you trying to address in the book?In my book, I start with a helicopter view by [former director of the International Tropical Timber Organization] Emmanuel Ze Meka, [with the questions], what’s going on in Central Africa? What’s at stake with regard to the rainforests? Then, I show the great biodiversity and the ecosystem services, which are key for the well-being of the people living there and for the world. I present issues and especially the solutions and opportunities for conservation and sustainable use of the Congo Basin rainforest, hand-in-hand with sustainable economic developments.For this reason, I also published a French version for the people in Central Africa so they can benefit from the best practices in the book. Let’s [take] charcoal. People go in the forest [and cut] trees for charcoal. That’s a big threat. There is a project in [the Democratic Republic of Congo] about charcoal, [in which] fast-growing trees [are grown] next to the farm, so people don’t need to go into the forest. They have enough charcoal, even more than they need themselves. Then, they can start selling charcoal and get away from poverty. When someone in Cameroon or Gabon reads about this example, [communities there] can do the same. When there’s something good in Cameroon and someone in [the Republic of Congo] reads about this, they can replicate it. That’s why there is a French version. What I have to stress is that this is not a book by a white man about Africa. I went to people from Central Africa, and I asked them, “What do you think needs to be done?” This is a book by Africans for Africans and for the world.An organic farmer in Cameroon. Image © Both ENDS and CENDEP.It does seem to be a guide for different approaches when it comes to looking at the forest and how we live in and around it.Yes, from many angles. There’s also a chapter about women’s rights and how to achieve women’s empowerment. Why? Because women know more about agriculture than men. They know more about the forest because they go into the forest, they look for vegetables, for mushrooms and for other food. They know their way around the forest, but their knowledge is not used in the communities. Of course, this is not good for the women themselves. This is not good for the community, and it’s not good for the forest. So I put women’s rights in the book because their empowerment is important for the forest.Langoué Bai in Ivindo National Park, Gabon. Image © David Greyo, courtesy of WCS and ANPN.Was it difficult to find funding, and might that be related to the lack of awareness that we have of the Congo Basin? For a lot of us, it’s still kind of this blank spot on the map in a lot of ways.At first, I approached the African Development Bank, and that door stayed closed. At some point, I came across COMIFAC (the Central African Forest Commission), a high-level organization of 10 countries in Central Africa focused on keeping the rainforest standing. And there is the Congo Basin Forest Partnership, [which is affiliated with COMIFAC]. In 2015 I went to the [organization’s] annual meeting in Cameroon to establish contacts both for content and funding. To make a long story short, the main funding comes from KfW (the German development bank), advised by the Central African Forest Commission to do so. It was the Africans who thought it was a good idea to produce a book like this.Sacks of charcoal in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Image © Isilda Nhantumbo.How did you select the people who either wrote chapters or played prominent roles as interview subjects in the book?I’ve traveled to Africa [for my work], and on the way I met people. I’ve been in communication of conservation for 25 years now. I have a lot of contacts also from previous books, so key experts advised me about whom to approach.You mentioned this being a personal project for you. I would imagine that having spent time in Central Africa, the place has affected you. Why is the Congo Basin important to you?First of all, it’s the people. I like getting to know the people of Central Africa very much. It’s not always easy to live in Central Africa. There’s a lot of poverty. There are a lot of problems, but many people still have a smile. I have this spot for them in my heart.There’s [also] this great rainforest with the great apes, and I love biodiversity. I get very sad and angry [to see] that biodiversity is diminishing, reduced by the way we organize our economy. I think the Congo Basin rainforest is a great treasure, and I want to help in ways I’m good at, [like] writing stories. That’s my way of getting attention and passing on good ideas to policymakers, to politicians, to NGOs, to banks, [and] to financial institutions.Also, I hope you agree that the reading is easy. Everybody who is 16 and speaks English should be able to understand what’s in the book. Why? Because many politicians and policymakers do not have specific knowledge of the rainforest, so I have to make it easy for them. When you have a look at the table of contents, which is two pages, you already know what’s going.The book went to European countries, but it was also passed on by others to forest institutions and companies in China, which is very important. A lot of timber [from Central Africa] often illegally goes through to China. Some institutions from China want to go in a sustainable direction, and they should. [It’s] in their own interest because if you keep emptying the forest, there will not be any timber in the future. Others brought the book to the United States Senate, and the book was on the table [during] international negotiations about financing conservation in the world, including forest conservation in the Congo Basin. The book has proven to be a good communication tool for the Congo Basin rainforest.Slash-and-burn agriculture in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Image by Meindert Brouwer.Why is it important to focus not just on the conservation of biodiversity, but the issues around sustainable use, for instance, Forest Stewardship Council certification and REDD+ (reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation)?Poverty needs to be addressed. Community development, economic development and improvement of income are key for forest conservation. If people have jobs and a decent income, they do not need to go into the forest for their livelihood. The book is about opportunities and solutions from many angles — economically, socially and ecologically. [In one example in the book], I wrote a story about community tourism, not about the high-end lodges where only the very rich go. When tourists come, people who have no jobs start getting an income because they look after transportation, they have a lodge, they cook for the tourists and the guides take them to the forest. My guide in Gabon used to be a hunter for commercial bushmeat, and he had no alternative. But now he has stopped hunting for commercial bushmeat because he’s paid by the tourists.[Similarly], if the people in the forest get a better yield and income from agriculture by being instructed about better techniques, if they can leave behind slash-and-burn agriculture, it’s in their benefit, and it’s also good for the forest.The chapter on palm oil production seems very much in that same vein. You’re talking about the need to build a foundation with the smallholders.People need palm oil, but you should produce it in a sensible and sustainable way. That’s why I approached this expert, [World Agroforestry Centre scientist] Peter Minang, who explains how you can do it in a sustainable way. It’s all about sustainability and balance. I stressed the necessity of sustainable agriculture because people need to eat. There is not enough food in the forest for so many people, and the population is growing, so there will be [parts] of the forest cut down for agriculture. It’s a main driver [of deforestation] together with the charcoal. If you have sustainable agriculture and you improve your yields, less forest needs to be cut.Nkundu girls in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Image © Jonas Eriksson Abana.Is there anything else you would like to add?The Congo Basin rainforest is very important for the well-being of the people in the region, for Africa as a whole and for the well-being of the world. Many tens of millions of people depend on it directly for their livelihood. It stores huge amounts of carbon dioxide and helps to reduce global warming. It is a rainmaker, indispensable for agriculture in sub-Saharan Africa. It is an immense source of fresh water in a world where fresh water gets more scarce every year. Its rivers can generate hydropower for the whole continent of Africa. There are many medicinal plant species, 20 of which are used in the treatment of cancer.Editor’s note: This interview was edited for length and clarity. All of the photos in this article appear in Central African Forests Forever by Meindert Brouwer.Banner image of Langoué Bai in Ivindo National Park, Gabon. Image © David Greyo/courtesy of WCS and ANPN. FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Agriculture, Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Bushmeat, Certification, China Logging, China’s Demand For Resources, Climate Change, Conservation, Corruption, Deforestation, Degraded Lands, Drivers Of Deforestation, Ecosystem Services, Ecotourism, Environment, Environmental Services, Forest People, Forest Stewardship Council, Forests, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Indigenous Peoples, Logging, Mining, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Plantations, Poaching, Poverty, Poverty Alleviation, Rainforest Agriculture, Rainforest Animals, Rainforest Biodiversity, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Ecological Services, Rainforest Logging, Rainforest Mining, Rainforests, Redd, Slash-and-burn, Timber, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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In West Papua, a development plan that doesn’t require clearing forest

first_imgConservation, Conservation Solutions, Environment, Forestry, Forests, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Land Rights, Rainforests, Tropical Forests Article published by mongabayauthor Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Indonesia’s West Papua province on the island of New Guinea has pledged to set aside 70 percent of its land area as protected or conservation areas. Local government decisions will be key to the plan’s success or failure.In the administrative district of Tambrauw within West Papua, local indigenous communities depend on the forest for their livelihoods.The head of Tambrauw district, Gabriel Asem, says he prioritizes the land rights of local communities and that conservation and sustainable development can go hand in hand. AYAPOKIAR, Indonesia — Mince and Atafia Momo make light work of the rocky terrain as they press toward higher ground deep in the Tambrauw forest. The pair move with a practiced agility, hauling gear in wicker baskets tied to a stretch of colorful fabric suspended around their foreheads.For Mince, who is 40, and Atafia, 22, these green valleys in the west of the island of New Guinea are a second home, a place to hunt, to fish, to find medicines and to forage for sago, a crucial source of carbohydrates in the diet of the Momo Kaa indigenous community. For them, and for Atafia’s two toddlers, conservation of these Tambrauw hillsides carries a sense of immediacy.“We can find sago, vegetables, fish, pigs or deer all here in the forest. And in the village we plant taro, sweet potatoes and chili,” Atafia tells Mongabay. “We never go hungry.”I met the pair by accident. I happened to be in Ayapokiar, Atafia and Momo’s village in Tambrauw, along with 12 University of Papua students participating in a bird survey led by researcher Sebastian “Bas” van Balen and Mirza Kusrini from the university’s forestry department. In 2017, Van Balen followed in the footsteps of Henry Cushier Raven’s 1912-1914 journey through Borneo to document biodiversity declines. I was looking for a companion to enter the forest and ran into Agustinus Momo, who suggested her sister, Atafia.She was at pains to make sure I had no problem working with a woman. “Here it’s much better,” she says. Whether it’s handling an unruly toddler at home or hauling sand on a construction site, women are generally considered the more diligent of the sexes. Atafia, for example, keeps watch over her two young children and helps pay the bills while her husband studies on a university scholarship in Palangkaraya, far away on the island of Borneo.Atafia, left, and Mince. Image by Een Irawan Putra.We push farther away from the village. Mince points out forest birds by name, explaining their behavior as they flutter between trees. The light through the forest is fading as we reach camp five hours after setting out.Sometimes Atafia brings a dog with her to take down a forest deer before she kills the animal with a spear, butchers the carcass and smokes the meat for preservation. “We don’t sell the venison, we eat it ourselves,” she said. “Because from here, everywhere is far.“Even if I had the time to go to Sorong [the provincial capital], the transportation is 500,000 rupiah [$35] one way,” she says. The journey can take around eight hours.This time Atafia and Momo have brought fishing rods. The Iri River is around a kilometer (0.6 miles) from camp. It might not sound far, but the steep, irregular inclines are enough to make pulses quicken. “This river is full of fish,” Atafia says.The rainforest in Tambrauw. Image courtesy of the Indonesia Nature Film Society.Tambrauw is one of more than 500 districts within 34 larger provinces in the Indonesian archipelago. Indonesia emerged from one of the most centralized forms of government in the world following the ouster of strongman ruler Suharto in 1998. The hundreds of district governments like Tambrauw now have considerable latitude over education and health spending, as well as authorizing permits for extractive industries in the forests Atafia and Momo call home.The district chief, known in Indonesia as a bupati, of Tambrauw is Gabriel Asem, a well-built man with a mustache as thick as the tree line in the Tambrauw valleys. Gabriel was elected head of Tambrauw when the administrative district was first created, in 2008. In his office he explains to me that around 80 percent of the 11,000 square kilometers (4,250 square miles) that make up the district are conservation areas.“In total there are 29 subdistricts and 216 villages in Tambrauw and we make the rules for protecting forests, beaches and elsewhere,” he told Mongabay last year. “It must all be agreed with the community of customary owners, because they have territorial rights.”Gabriel says he has long been told that by prioritizing conservation of these valleys he will sacrifice development. He disagrees.Indonesia’s statistics agency said in March 2018 that 35.3 percent of the rural population here in West Papua province lived in poverty (defined as the equivalent of 85 U.S. cents a day or less). That is the second-highest rate among the 34 provinces across Indonesia, while malnutrition remains one of the biggest killers of children under 5.Map of West Papua province (bright green). Image courtesy of Bwmodular/Wikimedia Commons.But Asem points to his district’s pristine beaches and mountains, as if to say they have assets beyond carving up land parcels into concessions for development. “That is where the community can benefit, because they will have a direct stake,” he says. “In the future they will be a source of income.”It’s a view in line with the larger development agenda in West Papua. Last October, the governors of West Papua and Papua provinces, which together make up the Indonesian half of New Guinea, signed a pledge to set aside 70 percent of their jurisdictions as protected or conservation areas. The region is home to some of the best forest left in Indonesia.Atafia. Image by Een Irawan Putra.The sun often beats down into the humid corridors of Tambrauw forest, but the weather can change in minutes, causing heavy rains to rush down mountainsides and accumulate in sumps on the forest floor. Atafia and Momo arrive back at camp from the river in driving rain. The pair have returned with dinner. They set down edible greens — pakis, gohi, gnemon — as well as a haul of fish.“We are very happy to be able to bring people here,” Atafia says. “They can see how us protecting the forests is good for our children and grandchildren.”***Een Irawan Putra is director of the Indonesia Nature Film Society, a media partner of Mongabay.Banner: A flower in West Papua. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published on our Indonesian site on Aug. 14, 2018.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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Norwood on defending Romeo: ‘We didn’t do our job’

first_imgPalace: Crisis over ABS-CBN franchise unlikely “I can’t lie, It’s frustrating, especially in a game that we need to win and the situation that is going on tonight,” said Rain or Shine swingman Gabe Norwood. “He stepped up for his team and that’s what he’s expected to do. We didn’t do our job as a unit to try to slow him down.”Despite the Elasto Painters’ best efforts, Romeo was still able to catch fire for GlobalPort, going 8-of-15 from threes, on top of six rebounds and six assists. FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSBreak new groundSPORTSMcGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC return“He hit a lot of shots, a lot of contested shots,” lamented Norwood, who was just one of those who manned the former Far Eastern University star. “It’s a team effort and I did my best to keep him in front of me, force some tough shots, but at the end of the day, we have to be on the same page defensively to stop their guard combination. It’s tough.”Norwood also said what makes Romeo such a tough cover is his sky-high confidence, which only makes him more deadly once he gets his rhythm going. MOST READ DILG to lock shops in Tagaytay City, other areas near Taal Federer beats Nadal in five-set thriller to win Australian Open Luis Manzano jokes about Mikee Morada’s proposal to Alex Gonzaga: ‘Baka nagtali lang ng sintas’ LATEST STORIES Ben&Ben, IV of Spades, SB19 win big at 5th Wish Music Awards “He has changed nothing. His confidence is through the roof and he works at it,” he said. “He missed a couple in the first quarter and I told him I know he’ll make the next one cause he puts in the work. He deserves every bucket that goes in. He can miss five in a row, but he knows he put in the work to make the next five. Kudos to him and we didn’t do the job to contest him.”Romeo’s career game allowed GlobalPort to clinch a seat in the 2017 PBA Philippine Cup quarterfinals, while Rain or Shine slipped to an even 5-5 card and is now in danger of falling out of the playoff picture.“We’re all disappointed on ourselves, but the biggest thing is though we had problems, the answer is in our locker room,” he said. “We can easily step up in the next game and take care of business and be in a good spot. We got a lot of tough guys and we got to rely on one another to get it done.”Rain or Shine takes one more crack at booking a ticket to the quarterfinals on Wednesday against Alaska.ADVERTISEMENT Anne Curtis talks about renewing faith in God amid the world’s ‘noise and clutter’ Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Marcos monument beside Aquino’s stirs Tarlac town Panelo: Duterte only wants to emulate strong political will of Marcos Bulacan inmates, jail guards raise donations for Taal victims Motorcycle taxis ‘illegal’ starting next week — LTFRB board member Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite View comments GlobalPort’s Terrence Romeo shoots over Rain or Shine’s Gabe Norwood. Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netTerrence Romeo was so slick on Sunday that he even managed to evade reporters after GlobalPort’s 117-99 win over Rain or Shine.Minutes after setting a career-high 44 points, the super scorer’s impact was still felt inside Cuneta Astrodome.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. last_img read more

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SMB set for PH Cup ‘3-peat’

first_imgChina counts sharp rise in coronavirus cases, 2 in Beijing MOST READ Marcos monument beside Aquino’s stirs Tarlac town Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite Read Next Yeoh, Vo top Asian Zone 3.3 chess tilt Prince Harry: ‘No other option’ but to cut royal ties Panelo: Duterte only wants to emulate strong political will of Marcos Trailing 0-3 and left as dead for all intents and purposes, the Beermen pulled off the first ever sweep of the last four games of a best-of-seven playoffs.June Mar Fajardo, who came out of sick bay to help the Beermen midway through the championship stage last year, has remained the biggest stumbling block for the Kings, who continue to miss their injured 7-foot center Greg Slaughter.The wide-bodied 6-10 Cebuano gives SMB an unstoppable scoring and rebounding threat as he pursues what looks like a sure fourth straight MVP award this year. And backing him up are crack guards Chris Ross and Alex Cabagnot and forwards Arwind Santos and Marcio Lassiter who form what is easily the strongest starting five in the tournament.Fajardo was honored as the Best Player of the Conference before Game 4 and to show his appreciation for the support of his teammates, he asked all the Beermen to join him in celebration.ADVERTISEMENT 2 ‘bookies’ bet collectors held in Quezon Palace: Crisis over ABC-CBN franchise unlikelycenter_img Prince Harry: ‘No other option’ but to cut royal ties Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparc Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Beaten black and blue in the title series opener, 109-82, the Kings rallied to make it 1-1 with an overtime 124-118 decision after blowing a 26-point lead in the second quarter.But the Beermen quickly dispelled doubts on their bid to pull off the second all-Filipino title three-peat with a sizzling finish in a 99-88 Game 3 victory before routing the Kings anew in Game 4, 94-85, behind a fiery show of three-point shooting.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSBreak new groundSPORTSMcGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC returnThe league’s oldest franchise, SMB is gunning for a 23rd championship and the fourth in the last seven tournaments under Leo Austria, once a topnotch guard for the now defunct Shell franchise.While he is a long way from matching the leading 19 titles of coach Tim Cone of Ginebra, Austria owns a record achievement that is now popularly referred to in the league as the “Beeracle” in last year’s title series against the Alaska Aces. For all the never-say-die hype associated with Ginebra San Miguel, the Gin Kings now need a miracle to salvage the PBA Philippine Cup title series against the defending champion San Miguel Beermen.With two contrasting but nevertheless impressive victories last week, the Beermen surged to a 3-1 lead in the best-of-seven championship playoffs against the highly popular Kings, who actually were lucky to avoid getting swept thus far.ADVERTISEMENT Beggar dead in Quezon hit-and-run incident LATEST STORIES Taal Volcano continues to emit steam, ash from weak explosions View commentslast_img read more

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Marc has the stats, Pau has wins in Gasols’ playoff battle

first_imgMarc has let his teammates know as well.He immediately got after rookie Andrew Harrison for not playing better defense when Pau hit a 3-pointer in Game 1. Pau, the NBA’s 43rd all-time scorer, is still capable of hitting big shots.“It’s a little frustrating as a guard,” Conley said. “You have to hear Marc get mad at you for letting Paul score. It’s always fun to see them compete, especially at the highest level.”Of course it’s even more fun when you’re winning.The Gasols tipped off against each other at the 2015 All-Star Game, becoming the first brothers to play against each other in that event. They are also Olympic teammates on Spain’s national team.Now they can add another milestone to their list of achievements, becoming the sixth set of siblings to meet in the NBA postseason.George and Ed Mikan were the first brothers to battle in the playoffs, facing off in 1949, 1950 and 1953. In 1983, Bernard King’s Knicks played brother Albert and the Nets, while Chuck and Wesley Person played each other in 1996. Harvey Grant with the 76ers met Horace Grant and his Orlando Magic in 1999. A year ago, Dorell Wright with Miami played brother Delon and Toronto.Pau says it’s hardest on their parents when he plays his little brother. Even though they take pride in one son being a two-time NBA champion and another the league’s 2013 defensive player of the year, these games can be tough.“They don’t enjoy the games that we play against each other too much,” Pau said. “They suffer. They don’t want us to hurt. One is going to be happy after the game, one is going to be upset. So you feel for the one that is upset. It is what it is. Now we’re in the playoffs, everything gets a little maximized, magnified.”Marc easily has outscored Pau so far with a career playoff-best 32 points in a href=’https://www.apnews.com/ed81ca9ea96b41a9ac9abf21c46e279f/Leonard-has-32-points,-Spurs-rout-Grizzlies-111-82-in-Game-1’Game 1 in a 111-82 loss to the Spurs/a, and he had 12 as San Antonio took a href=’https://www.apnews.com/378fc443779d4c19875cc1bebf36e914/Leonard’s-37-points-lead-Spurs-by-Grizzlies-96-82’Game 2 by a score of 96-82/a. Palace: Crisis over ABC-CBN franchise unlikely MOST READ The Gasols have been competing with and against each other since they were children — with Pau winning most of time. And Pau is enjoying the upper hand once again.“Put all those emotions aside and try to focus on what the Spurs have to do to beat the Grizzlies,” Pau said. “That’s what I’m going to try to focus on and help as much as I can.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSBreak new groundSPORTSMcGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC returnMarc and Pau are not the first players to have to put family ties aside for a few hours. The Mikans, Persons, Kings, Grants and Wrights all squared off in the NBA postseason.And there is another twist to the Gasols’ showdown. LATEST STORIES FEU dumps UST in UAAP men’s Final Four Whatever the stats are, Pau is busting with pride over the little brother he watched work so hard to become one of the NBA’s top centers.“I think he’s had an incredible NBA career so far,” Pau said.And there’s little doubt Pau wants Marc to have even more success — next year.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next More Taal volcanic quakes recorded despite weaker eruptions View comments SpaceX launches, destroys rocket in astronaut escape test Marcos monument beside Aquino’s stirs Tarlac towncenter_img Dozens wounded as Iraqi protesters up pressure on government Panelo: Duterte only wants to emulate strong political will of Marcos On the edge of America, census begins in a tiny Alaska town FILE – In this April 15, 2017, file photo, Memphis Grizzlies center Marc Gasol (33) is defended by San Antonio Spurs guard Danny Green (14) and center Pau Gasol during the second half in Game 1 of a first-round NBA basketball playoff series, in San Antonio. Pau and Marc Gasol have been battling each other on a basketball court since they were children with the older brother always finding ways to win. Now little brother Marc is doing his best to rally the Grizzlies to avoid being swept away in their first playoff meeting. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)Marc is winning the individual battle. Older brother Pau is walking away with the victories in the Gasols’ first NBA playoff battle.The sibling showdown between the Spaniards has added another dimension to the Grizzlies-Spurs opening-round Western Conference series.ADVERTISEMENT Presidency bid needs ‘deep reflection’ – Sara Duterte Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Christmas Eve chaos in Hong Kong as police and protesters clash PLAY LIST 01:17Christmas Eve chaos in Hong Kong as police and protesters clash00:50Trending Articles01:54Taal Volcano blankets towns in ash01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite Pau is returning to the city where he started his NBA career looking to do something he never managed while playing for the Grizzlies — winning a playoff game in Memphis. Pau’s Grizzlies set an NBA record for playoff futility, losing their first 12 postseason games with him on the roster.Playing for San Antonio ensures a mix of boos and cheers for Pau, who was Memphis’ first All-Star. His trade to the Lakers in 2008 helped bring Marc to the Grizzlies, and now Marc is a three-time All-Star and team leader alongside guard Mike Conley — and trying to beat his big brother yet again.“Now he has a better chance today than when he was younger,” Pau quipped.At 36, Pau no longer is the big man that leads a franchise, coming off the bench for San Antonio as the scoring option behind Kawhi Leonard, LaMarcus Aldridge and Tony Parker.“I wish he was starting so we could get more minutes against each other,” Marc said of Pau. “He knows what it’s about. He knows what I stand for, and how much I want to beat his team.”ADVERTISEMENT Canadian military mobilized to help Newfoundland dig outlast_img read more

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